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Brazilian resort town disappearing into the sea

The Atlantic Ocean advances an average of 6 meters (about 20 feet) annually in the small town of Atafona, north of Rio de Janeiro. The town has long been vulnerable to extreme erosion and is now exacerbated by climate change.

Vultures roam the sands of Brazil’s resort town of Atafona in the ruins of modern homes destroyed by the sea. Its constant rise has transformed the local coastline into an apocalyptic landscape.


The Atlantic Ocean travels an average of 6 meters a year in this small town north of Rio de Janeiro. This small town has long been vulnerable to extreme erosion and is now exacerbated by climate change.

The sea has already submerged more than 500 homes, turning the former idyllic coastline into a wrecked underwater graveyard.

The next one to lose his home is Joao Waked Peixoto.

Walk in the rubble of what was once his neighbor HouseHe sees what’s left: a fragment of a blue-painted room littered with tattered magazines, bicycles, and other wreckage of life.

“When do I have to leave? It’s unclear,” he says.

“The sea has advanced 3-4 meters in 15 days. Our walls may not last until next week.”

Awakened Peikoto’s grandfather built a house as a beach vacation with a villa, large rooms and a garden.

During the coronavirus pandemic, Waked Peixoto and his family traveled full-time.

But now it seems inevitable that the house will be swallowed by the sea.

“I’m sorry to lose this house because I have a lot of memories of the whole family,” he says.

The Brazilian town of Atafona, home to about 6,000 people, has long suffered from extreme erosion and is part of 4 percent.

The Brazilian town of Atafona, home to about 6,000 people, has long suffered from extreme erosion and is part of 4 percent of the world’s coastline, losing more than 5 meters each year.

Extreme erosion

With a population of about 6,000, Atafona has long suffered from extreme erosion. This is part of 4 percent of the world’s coastlines, which lose more than 5 meters each year.

The problem is exacerbated by Global warmingThis causes sea level rise, making currents and meteorological patterns more extreme, says Eduardo Bruhoz, a geologist at the Federal University of Fluminense.

But Atafona has had “chronic problems” for decades, he says.

The Paraiba do Sul River, whose estuary is Atafona, has shrunk due to mining, agriculture and other upstream drainage activities.

“In the last 40 years, the volume of rivers has dropped significantly, which means less sand is being transported to Atafona,” says Bulhoes.

When the sand is low, the town’s beaches stop regenerating naturally and give up the ground to the sea.

Coastal construction only exacerbated the problem by removing dunes and vegetation, the natural defenses of the beach.

The result is disastrous for tourism and fishing.

“Big boats can no longer pass through the delta … and money has disappeared together,” says Elialdo Bastos Meirelles, head of a community of about 600 local fishermen.

“The river is dead.”

Municipalities have studied plans to curb erosion in the town of Atafona in Brazil, including the construction of embankments to reduce fo.

Municipalities have considered plans to curb the erosion of the town of Atafona in Brazil, such as building embankments to reduce the force of ocean waves and transporting sand from the delta to the beach, but the project is currently on paper. Only exists in.

‘Abandoned’

Municipalities have studied several plans to curb erosion, such as building embankments to reduce the force of ocean waves and transporting sand. delta To the beach.

Geologist Buhlhoes proposed the latter. It is modeled on similar initiatives in the Netherlands, Spain and the United States.

But so far, the project only exists on paper.

Alex Ramos, Under Secretary of Environment for the county, told AFP that no one has yet come up with a definitive solution, and that any plan needs to be approved by environmental regulators first.

Meanwhile, the county has launched a social assistance program that pays R $ 1,200 a month to more than 40 families who have lost their homes due to erosion.

However, critics have blamed the local government for lack of political will.

“We continue to listen to our promises,” says Veronica Vieira, head of the Neighborhood Association SOS Atafona.

“But this town has been abandoned. It’s an apocalypse. It makes you want to cry.”


Coastal erosion can force withdrawal from the sea


© 2022 AFP

Quote: Brazilian resort town disappearing into the sea (February 14, 2022) gets February 14, 2022 from https: //phys.org/news/2022-02-brazil-resort-town-sea.html Did

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Brazilian resort town disappearing into the sea

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