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Climate change threatens the treasures of Hadrian’s walls in England

Vindolanda is a former Roman fortress on the walls of Hadrian, spanning 73 miles (118 km) north of England.

Built to prevent hordes of barbarians, 1900 years later, archaeologists on the walls of Hadrian in northern England face a new enemy of climate change that threatens a vast treasure trove of Roman crafts.


Thousands of soldiers and many of their families lived around 73 miles (118 kilometers). IshigakiCross the UK from West coast Towards the east coast, it marks the limits of the Roman Empire and forms Britain’s largest archaeological feature of Rome.

The wall began in 122 AD during the reign of Emperor Hadrian, marking the border between Roman Britain and unconquered Caledonia, helping to keep barbarian assailants away from the empire.

The Roman soldiers who lived there Wooden architecture But the fascinating wreckage of everyday life that allows archaeologists today to reconstruct how they lived in the windswept north of the empire.

These include the Vindolanda fort, about 33 miles west of the modern city of Newcastle upon Tyne, the Roman settlement at the original eastern end of the wall, what was then called Pons Aerius.

“Many landscapes of Hadrian’s walls are preserved under peat swamps and swamps. Very moist, very moist ground that has protected archeology for almost two thousand years,” he said. Andrew Burley, head of the excavation and chief executive officer of the Bindoranda Trust, said. AFP.

The walls marked the northern limit of the Roman Empire and formed a defensive barrier between the Roman Empire and the unconquered kale.

The walls marked the northern limit of the Roman Empire and formed a defensive barrier between the Roman Empire and the unconquered Caledonia.

“But when global warming occurs, Climate change It happens, “he added.

The ground heats up faster than the temperature, solidifying the previously moist soil and taking in oxygen from the cracks that occur.

“When that oxygen gets in there, there are really delicate things that are made of leather, textiles, wood products, cracks, putrefaction and are lost forever,” Burley said.

Under the threat

Over the years, dramatic landscapes around the walls reveal stone and wood structures, leather shoes and clothing, tools, weapons and even hand-painted wooden tablets, Roman life in Britain. Has given us knowledge of what it was like.

Only about a quarter of the ruins of Vindolanda have been excavated, and the fort is only one of the 14 along the walls of Hadrian. Hadrian’s ramparts have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987 and are one of Britain’s most famous ancient tourist attractions.

Archaeologists say that climate change is affecting the preservation of ancient relics because the moist, muddy soil is dry in h.

Archaeologists say that climate change is affecting the preservation of ancient relics because the moist, muddy soil is hot and dry.

“All this, all this masonry, all the ground behind me was underground. It was under the peasant’s field 50 years ago,” Burley said.

“Less than 1% of Hadrian’s walls have been archaeologically investigated, and much of the landscape is protected by this moist peatland environment, which is truly a threatening landscape.”

Behind him are dozens of Roman shoes of all genders, ages and social classes. It’s just a small part of the approximately 5,500 leather goods found on the site alone so far.

Thanks to the black and muddy soil, many relics retain fascinating levels of detail.

“It’s great because they completely changed our perception of the Roman army of the Roman Empire, they turned it from a men’s reserve to a lot of women and children running around,” he says. I did.

“And if these relics hadn’t survived, we wouldn’t have that information, and it’s the kind of thing threatened by climate change.”

An event will be held this year to commemorate the 1900th anniversary of the construction of the UNESCO World Heritage-listed wall.

An event will be held again this year to commemorate the 1900th anniversary of the construction of the UNESCO World Heritage-listed wall.

The race begins

An event is being held this year to commemorate the 1900th anniversary of the construction of the wall.

According to Burley, this anniversary is an opportunity to think of ways to make sure that the walls and their relics remain for the next 1,900 years.

“The Roman army has embarked on one of the largest construction works of the entire empire,” he said.

“In this wonderful countryside around me, they changed it and created the walls of Hadrian, a barrier that crosses the center of the country.”

Now, instead of protecting Rome’s Britain from unconquered Caledonia in the north, competition continues between archaeologists and climate change.

“Can you find out what’s happening to these sites? Can you intervene where you can to protect your sites? And can you save the material before it’s gone forever?” ? ”


How climate change is washing away valuable evidence of our distant past


© 2022 AFP

Quote: Climate change threatens the treasures of Hadrian’s walls in England (February 8, 2022) February 8, 2022 https://phys.org/news/2022-02-climate-threatens-hadrian-wall -Get from treasures.html

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Climate change threatens the treasures of Hadrian’s walls in England

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