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Exotic mix in Chinese moon rock delivery

A collision crater investigated as a possible cause of exotic debris in the landing site of Chang’e 5 (43.06 degrees north latitude, 51.92 degrees west longitude), the location of the area adjacent to the moon, and the recently returned lunar material. Credit: Qian et al. 2021

On December 16, 2020, China’s first sample return mission to the Moon, Chang’e 5, succeeded in delivering nearly two kilograms of rock debris and dust to Earth from our heavenly companions. Chang’e 5 landed in an area of ​​the moon that was not sampled by the NASA Apollo or Soviet Luna programs nearly 50 years ago, and was the youngest moon rock fragment brought back for analysis at a laboratory on Earth. Was collected. Early-stage findings using geological maps to link “exotic” fragments of collected samples to features near the landing site were presented by PhD Yuqi Qian. Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2021 Virtual Conference, a student at the Geological University of China.


Chang’e-5 Landing point It is located at the western end of the North Oceanus Procellarum just before the moon. It is one of the youngest geological areas of the Moon, about 2 billion years old. The material scraped from the surface constitutes the loose soil that results from the fragmentation and pulverization of billions of years of moon rock due to impacts of various sizes.

The study presented by Qian probably accounts for 90% of the material collected by Chang’e-5. landing A type of site called “sea basalt” and its surroundings.They are Volcanic rock It appears to us as a dark gray area spilled to most of the vicinity of the moon as an ancient eruption of lava. However, 10% of the fragments have distinctly different “exotic” chemical compositions, preserving records of other parts of the lunar surface and hints of the types of cosmic rocks that affected the lunar surface. There is a possibility.

Qian and colleagues at Brown University and the University of Münster have investigated potential sources of beads in rapidly cooling glassy materials. They tracked these glassy droplets to the extinct volcanic spouts known as “Lima Mylan” and “Lima Sharp” about 230 and 160 km southeast and northeast of Chang’e 5’s landing site. rice field. These fragments may provide insight into past episodes of volcanic activity, such as energetic fountains on the Moon.

Exotic mix in Chinese moon rock delivery

Expanding the location of Chang’e 5’s landing site, it shows a nearby collision crater investigated as a possible cause of exotic debris in the recently returned lunar material. Credit: Qian et al. 2021

Credit: Europlanet
  • Exotic mix in Chinese moon rock delivery

    Schematic diagram of the lunar lander of Chang’e 5 mission. Credits: CNSA (China National Space Administration) / CLEP (China Lunar Exploration Program) / GRAS (Ground Research Application System).

  • Exotic mix in Chinese moon rock delivery

    A panoramic image taken after the lunar surface was sampled by Chang’e 5. The four dark trenches in the lower right corner of this image are where the samples were collected. The surface around the landing site of Chang’e 5 is rich in centimeter-sized boulders. Credits: CNSA (China National Space Administration) / CLEP (China Lunar Exploration Program) / GRAS (Ground Research Application System).

  • Exotic mix in Chinese moon rock delivery

    Image of Chang’e 5 sample “CE5C0400” from the moon. This portion of lunar matter returned to Earth by Chang’e 5 weighs about 35 grams and was collected by a robotic arm. Credits: CNSA (China National Space Administration) / CLEP (China Lunar Exploration Program) / GRAS (Ground Research Application System).

The team also investigated the potential causes of impact-related fragments. The young geological age of the rocks at the landing site narrows the search, as only craters under the age of 2 billion can be held accountable, and these are relatively rare on the side of the Moon facing the Earth. The team modeled potential contributions from a particular crater to the south and southeast (Aristarchus, Kepler, Copernicus), northwest (Harding), and northeast (Harpulse). Qian’s findings show that Harpalus is a key contributor to many exotic fragments in the transport of Chang’e-5 samples, and these rock fragments address permanent uncertainty about the age of this crater. Indicates that it may provide a way to do it. Some debris may have been thrown into the Chang’e 5 landing area, about 1,300 kilometers away.

Modeling and reviewing work by other teams has linked other exotic rock fragments to silica-rich domes, high-altitude terrains, and pale mountains. rock Surround the landing point.

“All local exotic material in Chang’e 5’s returned sample can be used to answer even more scientific questions,” Qian said. “By working on these, we will gain a better understanding of the history of the Moon and help prepare for further lunar exploration.”


Chinese capsules with moon rocks begin to return to Earth


For more information:
Yuqi Qian et al, The Exotic Materials at the Chang’e-5 Landing Site, EPSC2021 (2021). DOI: 10.5194 / epsc2021-447

Provided by Europlanet

Quote: Https: //phys.org/news/2021-09-exotic-china-delivery-moon.html Obtained from September 24, 2021 Chinese Moon Rock Delivery (September 24, 2021) Exotic mix of

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