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Heart Health Problems in Their Twenties Can Affect Thinking Skills Decades Later

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People in their 20s and 30s who have health problems such as high blood pressure, obesity, and hyperglycemia have problems with their thinking and memory skills decades later than those without these health problems. Most likely, the online version of March 17, 2021 Neurology..

“These results are impressive and suggest that early adulthood may be an important time in the relationship between these health problems and cognitive skills in later years,” said the University of California, San Francisco. Research author Christine Jaffe, MD, and members say. Of the American Academy of Neurology. “Treatment or correction of these health problems in early adulthood may prevent or alleviate later thinking skills problems.”

In this study, researchers pooled the results of four studies and followed a total of 15,000 people between the ages of 18 and 95 between the ages of 10 and 30. They had numbers of people’s body mass index (BMI), blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol intake at least three times. Thinking and memory were tested every 1-2 years.

For study participants who were older at the start of the study, they estimated the levels of cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure and BMI when they were young. Next, researchers investigated whether early-adult, middle-aged, and late-life cardiovascular problems were associated with a significant decrease in late-life scores on thought and memory tests.

High BMI, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose levels during each period were associated with a significant decrease in thinking skill scores in later years. Having these health problems in early adulthood was associated with the greatest changes in thinking skills, or twice the average rate of decline over a 10-year period. Results remained even after researchers adjusted for other factors that could affect thinking skills, such as education level, age, and gender.

High total cholesterol at all times was not associated with a significant decline in thinking skills.

People in their 20s and 30s with a BMI greater than 30 and considered obese had thought test scores worse by about 3-4 points over a 10-year period than those with a normal range of BMI. This was twice the rate of cognitive decline.

The results were similar for systolic blood pressure, or for people in their 20s and 30s whose upper limits were above 140 mmHg. Few people in their 20s and 30s had high blood sugar levels, but their cognitive function declined further and their scores dropped by 9-10 points.

“As more young people develop diabetes and obesity in early adulthood and poor diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular problems, this has significant public health implications for cognitive health in later years,” said Jaffe. May give. The impact of reducing these risk factors is substantial. “

Yaffe pointed out that the study did not show a causal link between health problems and problems in later years with thinking skills. Only associations are displayed.

The limitation of the study was that the estimates may not be accurate because researchers estimated the levels of cardiovascular risk factors at an earlier age for some study participants who were older at the start of the study.


Heart Health Problems in Their Twenties Can Affect Brain Health Decades Later


Courtesy of the American Academy of Neurology

Quote: Heart health problems in their twenties, decades later (March 17, 2021) from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-03-heart-health-problems-20s-affect.html 2021 May affect thinking skills acquired on March 17, 2014

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Heart Health Problems in Their Twenties Can Affect Thinking Skills Decades Later

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