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IBM ships high-density tape drives based on the latest specifications

IBM has announced the general availability of the industry’s first magnetic tapes and drives based on: LTO-9 Ultrium specification For large data capacity and resoring force.

The Linear Tape-Open (LTO) 9 specification has a 50% increase in capacity over the LTO-8. That’s 18 TB of native capacity, or 45 TB after data compression. Fujifilm and Sony announced the media last month, but IBM was the first to install the drive.

With the previous LTO specifications, the capacity has increased by 100%, and the transfer speed improvement of LTO-9 is also quite modest. For compressed data, it increases from 750MB / sec of LTO-8 to 1GB / sec, and for uncompressed data, it increases from 360MB / sec to 440MB / sec. The tape may have reached its limit.

However, IBM has a fix. The new drive also features IBM’s new Open Recommendation Access Order (oRAO). This is a data acquisition accelerator that reduces the seek time for an application to acquire data from tape. oRAO can be used with both compressed and uncompressed data, and IBM claims that these access times can be reduced by 73%.

IBM positions tape as a solution to security concerns, especially ransomware. Full-height IBM LTO-9 tape drives are designed to natively support data encryption, with core hardware encryption and decryption capabilities stored on the tape drive itself, resulting in data from viruses and jamming. The risk of breakage is reduced.

IBM also advertises the cost benefits of tapes, stating that it costs $ .0059 / GB per month, or $ 5.89 / TB. The LTO-9-based tape library can store up to 39 PB of compressed data in a 10-square-foot tape library with LTO-9 Ultrium tape cartridges.

Copyright © 2021 IDG Communications, Inc.

IBM ships high-density tape drives based on the latest specifications

Source link IBM ships high-density tape drives based on the latest specifications

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