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Molecular biology graduates support the development of rapid testing for Ebola virus

Early detection of illness is the key to effective treatment, which makes biomedical researchers around the world a lifesaver. Krystle Agans The ’05 is a life-saving panther that recently helped develop a new rapid test for Ebola virus using the D4 assay, which could make a difference whether patients will be treated in time at some point.

Agans is a BioContainment Researcher III at the University of Texas School of Medicine (UTMB) in Galveston, Texas. Agans worked with teams from UTMB, Duke University, and the Galveston National Laboratory to test Ebola samples and the industry’s current gold standard, the RT-PCR test, as a comparative detection method. She also developed a design of experiments for device validation.

“Currently used RT-PCR requires refrigeration, excessive sample manipulation, and up to 6 days to obtain results. D4 produces results in about 30 minutes, 24 hours faster than RT-PCR. Can detect, “which has a significant impact on the tracking, containment, and treatment of potentially infected contacts. “This device is small, easy to use, and can be applied in the field with limited power and resources.”

She says she’s passionate about her work as she sees how emerging infectious diseases can disrupt communities, disrupt medical professionals, and terrorize the world. I will.

“The 2014 outbreak emphasized the need for more sophisticated methods for detecting entities that have a clear advantage in terms of evolution.”

The Florida Institute of Technology lab setting taught skills that could never be achieved in a school or professional setting due to the intimacy of small classes and the involvement of professors. This directly affected the ability to lead and understand complex experiments.

Krystle Agans ’05, BioContainment Researcher, UTMB

She began working at UTMB after years of experience dealing with monkeypox, bird flu, anthrax, tularemia, and plague at the Battle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio, and the Loverace Respiratory Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I did.

However, she holds a degree in molecular biology from the Florida Institute of Technology and believes she has influenced her employer to hire her.

“The Florida Institute of Technology lab setting taught skills that could never be achieved in a school or professional setting due to the intimacy of small classes and the involvement of professors. This led and understood complex experiments. It directly affected my ability to do. “

Q & A

Quarantine activity: Not applicable; COVID-19 was investigated during the pandemic.

Pets: A dog named Roxy, a mix of energetic Dalmatians and whippets

Your happy place: Pool or beach

Alternative carrier: chef

Florida Institute of Technology Favorite Memories: Melbourne beach volleyball

Molecular biology graduates support the development of rapid testing for Ebola virus

Source link Molecular biology graduates support the development of rapid testing for Ebola virus

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