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Seabirds are hungry for stormy “washing machine” waves: research

In 2014, tens of thousands of seabirds were launched on the coast of Ile de Ré in France.

Thousands of seabirds washed off the Atlantic coast each year can be starved to death by a wave-stirring cyclone in a “washing machine,” experts say, which can be exacerbated by climate change. I’m warning you.


Puffins, murrelets, guillemots-durable little bird Its Nest in the Arctic — heads south each year to Newfoundland, Iceland, or the kinder and more isolated islands off Norway.

However, many were found to have been washed up on the beach during a mass death. Scientists believe that the intense winter cyclones prevent them from being fed.

“Winds at 120 km / h (75 mph), waves at 8 m (26 ft) high, and turbulence that disturbs plankton and bird-fed fish schools,” said David Gremylet of the Center National de la Recherche Scientifique. Imagine it. “Coordinated studies published on Tuesday Current biology..

“They are in big trouble Washing machine“He told AFP.

Inability to avoid storms, some of which may be in the last days, birds unable to dive into the sea and feed, or to see prey in problematic waters.

Due to its low body fat reserves, murrelets can die after 48 hours of inactivity.

Scientists suspected that the storm was the cause of the bird’s killing, according to Gremilet.

“But what we didn’t know was where and how,” he said.

Researchers have equipped more than 1,500 puffins, murrelets, murrelets, and two types of murrelets with global location sensors.

Researchers have equipped more than 1,500 puffins, murrelets, murrelets, and two types of murrelets with global location sensors.

Declined

To investigate, an international research team decided to track birds from 39 different colonies in the North Atlantic.

Focusing on five species, we have installed global location sensors on more than 1,500 puffins, murrelets, seagulls, and two types of seagulls.

Sensors were clipped to animal paws at various nesting sites in the summer to track the winter movement of birds.

Scientists were able to identify where the birds encountered the cyclone by examining bird movement data for about a decade and comparing it to winter weather patterns.

They used the model to estimate how much energy the bird was using to fly in the storm and ruled out the cold and tiredness of the murderer.

Therefore, Gremilet said that the most likely explanation was ” Meteorological conditions It’s so scary that birds can’t feed. “

Birds are forced to wait for storms and are probably prevented from jumping into the sea to feed

Birds are forced to wait for storms and may be prevented from jumping into the sea to feed.

Manon Clairebo, lead author of research at the University of Montpellier, said their bodies were particularly debilitated when tens of thousands of dead puffins and giremots were launched on the French coast in 2014.

The global population of these birds has been around since the 1970s. Habitat loss, Pollution, competition with fishermen, and accidental capture in the main threats.

And Gremilet is a cyclone whose “frequency and intensity” is expected to increase. Climate change, Can be a bigger threat.

There is little that can be done to prevent a killer storm, but experts say that mapping them will allow conservationists to drive stronger protection. Commercial fishing— For their road habitat.

“It’s important to understand the dangers that threaten them,” Clairebo said.


Cyclones starve North Atlantic seabirds


For more information:
North Atlantic winter cyclones starve seabirds, Current biology (2021). DOI: 10.1016 / j.cub.2021.06.059

© 2021 AFP

Quote: Seabirds are hungry for stormy “washing machine” waves: Study (September 15, 2021) from https://phys.org/news/2021-09-seabirds-starve-stormy-machine.html Obtained September 15, 2021

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Seabirds are hungry for stormy “washing machine” waves: research

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