Florida

Sunshine dim due to Democrats in election losses, cash predicament

Tallahassee (AP)

Democrats may be pleased with the bright outlook in Arizona and Georgia, and may have a faint light of hope in Texas, but their anxiety is growing in Florida. For the Democratic Party.

When Jockey began taking over Governor Rondesantis and US Senator Marco Rubio in 2022, the Democratic disadvantage to the Republican Party was that they would develop a cohesive strategy and rebuild a debt- and confused state-wide party. It will be more serious than ever.

Former President Donald Trump’s populist brand has boosted the Republican surge in Florida. Here, Trump defeated President Joe Biden by more than 3 percent last fall. This more than doubled the lead over Hillary Clinton. Republicans also seized seats in two parliaments and expanded the majority in the State Capitol.

And that was despite Michael Bloomberg spending $ 100 million to support the state’s Democrats. Once spending aggregation is complete, the final election cycle in Florida is expected to be ranked as one of the most expensive in state history. The lack of returns in Florida could be large elsewhere, with national parties and donors investing their efforts.

“No one knows who is happy to invest $ 100 million and not win,” said Manny Diaz, the new chairman of the Democratic Party of Florida.

“I’ve heard people ask: Do we give up Florida? They say we won the White House in Georgia and Arizona, and we didn’t need Florida.” Said Diaz. “I admit that it should not be our place today.”

Democratic strategist Steve Schale said States parties need to show that “things are moving in a positive orbit.”

“One of my concerns is that it would be a big lift for people to spend money here again,” Schale said.

Meanwhile, Florida’s Democrats have debts of up to $ 860,000 and had to revoke their health insurance coverage at the end of last year, urging the National Party and other state party organizations to provide some support. did.

Michael Binder, director of the University of North Florida Public Opinion Institute, said it was clear that Democrats had lost their place. Democrats have experienced far more attention-grabbing defeats than recent victories and have not won the governor’s election for a quarter of a century.

“Yes, we have all these close quarters — but it’s the Republicans who are winning,” Binder said.

In 2008, Florida Democrats enjoyed nearly 700,000 voter registration advantages over Republicans, providing a significant cushion in Sen at the time. Barack Obama defeated Republican Senator John McCain in the state with less than 205,000 votes. Republicans have narrowed their registration cushions considerably in recent years.

Currently, the state has only one Democrat, Agricultural Commissioner Nikki Fried, in state-wide positions. He is in a position to run for a higher position, probably for the governor.

Major Democrats argue that it is a mistake for country donors to leave Florida and protect themselves. In the presidential election, the state has a large number of electoral college votes. It currently has 29 votes, but could grow to 31 as the state’s population grows exponentially.

The Chair of the State party, Diaz, is trying to reverse the slide of voter registration dominance over the Republican Party. As of January 31, its leads had dropped to just 110,000 voters. Meanwhile, the rank of independent voters has risen from 2.1 million in 2008 to more than 3.8 million today.

Over the last decade, the state has grown with nearly 2.9 million inhabitants, many of whom are attracted to the state’s climate and relatively affordable prices. Many appear to arrive from more conservative regions of the country, such as the Midwest.

“We know these new registrants are centre-rights,” said Ryan Tyson, a Republican pollster and strategist, citing the party’s data analysis. “The Democratic Party is already at a disadvantage to funding and candidates, and with the added disadvantage of an influx of new participants, it’s a difficult hill to climb.”

“I think they’re asking people to step into the circular saw,” Tyson said of a Democrat who is considering a state-wide implementation.

Susie Wiles, who launched the Trump campaign in Florida in 2020, said the Democratic Party can still win with the right candidates, a compelling message, and ample financial support. She warns fellow Republicans about “resting in our glory” and runs the risk of losing their own donors.

“I disagree with the theory that Florida has turned red. To be honest, both parties, frankly, know how difficult it is to win here, so I just roll my eyes. “I will.” Wiles added.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, the Republicans launched a voter-registered blitzkrieg last year. This was largely not the opposition of the Democrats, and caused criticism that the Democrats in Florida weren’t fighting enough to beat voters.

“We always need to participate in a minority community, and not only when voting, but also state senator Annette Taddeo is considering running for governor and has long criticized the Parties. She’s doing more to raise that rank. She pointed out the decline in Democratic support from Hispanic voters in South Florida as decisive in the presidential election.

Tadeo argues that the Democrats can win in Florida, even if the Republicans dominate.

Other Democrats haven’t given up either.

Tallahassee lawyer and democratic fundraiser Don Hinkle said, “If you pass the roulette wheel and turn red nine out of the last ten, it doesn’t mean your next spin will turn red.” Said.

But should donors bet on Florida performance?

“In reality, we have no choice,” he said. “You can’t leave the fight because your stakes are too high.”

Sunshine dim due to Democrats in election losses, cash predicament

Source link Sunshine dim due to Democrats in election losses, cash predicament

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