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Supervisor: LiveUpdate: Trial over George Floyd’s murder: NPR

David Proger, a former sergeant of the Minneapolis Police Department who was Derek Chauvin’s shift supervisor, said on Thursday about George Floyd’s neck policeman’s knee, until he was hospitalized, or how long Chauvin had Floyd. He told the court that he had not been informed of whether he had held it for a period of time. That position.

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David Proger, a former sergeant of the Minneapolis Police Department who was Derek Chauvin’s shift supervisor, said on Thursday about George Floyd’s neck policeman’s knee, until he was hospitalized, or how long Chauvin had Floyd. He told the court that he had not been informed of whether he had held it for a period of time. That position.

Court TV via AP

Retired sergeant Minneapolis Police Department David Proger stopped resistance after former police officer Derek Chauvin’s trial on Thursday when Floyd was handcuffed because the troops used against George Floyd were too long. I testified that I should have finished.

“They may have ended their detention when Mr Floyd was no longer offering resistance to police,” Proger told the court.

“It would be reasonable to kneel someone’s neck until they no longer resist, but when they are no longer combative, they should stop it,” he said, and police officers put detained subjects on their side. He added that he was supposed to put it down and help. According to police policy, their breathing.

Ploeger was Thursday’s last witness and opened the door to what is likely to be the technical part of the trial.

Chauvin’s shift supervisor, Proger, and three other police officers who answered a phone call about a man trying to use counterfeit banknotes at Cup Foods, were on the unit to see if it was Chauvin. I was repeatedly asked about the policy of using force. Violated or acted within that protocol.

A veteran law enforcement officer is a supervisor called by 911 dispatcher Jena Scully on the day Floyd died in police detention. Scully, who testified on Monday, was wary of watching real-time video footage of the arrest and told the court that police had fixed Floyd on the ground in a prone position. She initially believed that the dispatch screen was frozen.

The court heard her telling Proger that the case had not been reported at that time, although she believed the police had used excessive force in a tape she called the department.

The call urged Proger to call Chauvin on his cell phone, the exchange the jury first heard on Thursday.

In the call, the sergeant asks Chauvin what is happening.

“I was just going to call, and you came out on our scene here,” you can hear the defendant saying.

“We had to hold down the guy. He was crazy …. he didn’t go behind the team,” Chauvin said before the recorded part of the phone was cut off. Said.

When the spectator narrates what looks like his last breath, he doesn’t tell Proger that he managed to suppress Floyd by pushing his knees into the neck of a black man for almost nine minutes.

“I think he told me they tried to get Mr. Floyd in. I didn’t know his name at the time. Mr. Floyd was in the car. He became combative,” Proger said. I recalled at the stand.

“I think he said he had injured his bloody lips, either in his nose or mouth, and after all, after wrestling with him, he received first aid, an ambulance was called, and they left the scene. “Pluoeger continued.

Following the call, Proger said he had driven to the scene of the incident, when he arrived there he knew the significance of the situation. But even after he arrived, he told the court that Chauvin and other officers knelt on Floyd’s neck and back long after the defendant was handcuffed and he died. I didn’t let him know.

It wasn’t at the Hennepin County Medical Center until late that night that Chauvin finally told him what he had done, Proger said. But the policeman did not specify the length of time, he fixed Floyd.

Attorney Eric Nelson spends a lot of cross-examination to explain how officers are needed to assess different threat levels in a particular situation and modify their behavior accordingly. I asked Proger a fictitious question.

If the crowd of bystanders becomes more and more unstable during the arrest, Nelson asked, should police officers focus on the arrest or the crowd?

“I think we need to process both at the same time,” Ploeger replied.

Nelson then proposed a more extreme scenario: he asked if Proger was involved in a shootout and injured a person, he would either deal with the threat or perform CPR on a fictitious victim. Is it? ”

Ploeger said it would address the threat.

In response to another Nelson question, Proger said he agreed that officers sometimes had to do very violent things.

Later, prosecutor Steve Schleicher picked up the same thread, but got it from the opposite angle.

“The information they capture will sometimes force police to take more drastic steps, but sometimes the information they capture will not force them to take less dramatic steps,” Schleicher said. It was.

“It’s the correct answer,” Ploeger replied.

“Some information police officers need to capture is whether the subject is resisting, and if the subject is not, it is no longer necessary to keep them in custody,” the prosecutor asked.

“correct.”

Schleicher then asked if it was reasonable for police officers to take into account the subject’s medical condition in a critical thinking model.

“For example, if a subject stops breathing, is it important to take that into account …. Or if the subject loses a pulse, they take it into account and probably take another step. Need to decide?

“Yes,” Proger agreed.

“And in such cases, police officers may not need to do anything violent, but they may not be so violent. Give medical assistance?”

Again, Ploeger said so.

Schleicher then returned to Nelson’s example of a shootout.

“You didn’t see the shootout,” he asked, referring to various videos that Proger reviewed about the incident.

“No,” Proger replied.

Supervisor: LiveUpdate: Trial over George Floyd’s murder: NPR

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