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Trained architects use their knowledge of construction to create gingerbread.Business observer

Every holiday season, gingerbread houses spawn around the area, disrupting the construction process for most people.

Jonathan Moore, a trained architect, representative of Tampa-based owners, and president of InVision Advisors, a project and banking consulting firm, is not confused. This year he built the Gingerbread Tampa Museum.

courtesy. Jonathan Moore, a trained architect, representative of Tampa-based owners, and president of InVision Advisors, a project and banking consulting firm, uses his experience to resemble the Art Institute of Tampa. I am making a nice gingerbread.

“I’m not a professional gingerbread man, but an architect,” Moore tells Coffee Talk. “I attended an architecture school and have been modeling for over 30 years.”

Over the years, Moore has worked with children to create several gingerbread pieces, including kennels, rocket boats, and the Eiffel Tower. After serving as the owner representative of St. Pete Wharf, Moore will use his knowledge of the wharf’s structural system to build the Gingerbread Wharf again this year.

Whether you’re working on a 69-story tower or creating a gingerbread, the specific principles are the same. “Every good architect starts with a series of blueprints,” Moore says. “When we manage a project, we spend as much time on paper as we know that things are easy to understand on paper.” First about the structure of Gingerbread. Draw them in and then create a template to help you cut the dough.

“If this were a real building, we needed a solid foundation,” Moore says. “The first thing I do is choose the right base.” For gingerbread, it’s important to use a base that’s sturdy enough to support the weight of the structure and won’t break when you move the piece. is.

Another tip? The material is important. There’s nothing wrong with the gingerbread kit, but by making your own gingerbread, you can start from scratch and have a blank canvas for construction. He is also keen on frosting to splice pieces together. “Frosting is very forgiving — and it’s very tasty,” Moore says. “Frosting works like a concrete block mortar.”

One of the things Moore doesn’t do is stick to the details. “I have never built a true replica of the Gingerbread House,” he says. “Gingerbread houses need to be capricious. They need to make you smile. Gumdrops take the place of people, Twisler becomes the pillar, and there is an unlimited budget.”

Trained architects use their knowledge of construction to create gingerbread.Business observer

Source link Trained architects use their knowledge of construction to create gingerbread.Business observer

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