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UK waste gets a new life lease

The staff at Upcircle, a British cosmetics company that uses the remaining natural ingredients to make skin care products, collects used coffee grounds for diversion in southern London.

From facial scrubs with coffee grounds to clothes made from PET bottles and furniture adorned with Ryuzetulan fibers, waste upcycling and reuse efforts are gaining attention in the UK.


Skin care brand Upcircle’s bicycle courier visits 25 cafes in London daily, collecting about 100 kg (220 pounds). coffee Grounds that would otherwise be abandoned.

Founded six years ago by Anna Brightman and her brother Wilbrightman, Upcircle recycles ground coffee to make it. Beauty productsAdd ingredients such as chamomile infusion and powder made from olive stone.

After working for a multinational corporation, the brothers took the plunge and set up their own business.

“I wanted to do something close to my heart,” Anna Brightman told AFP.

“It was my brother who was the first inspiration when asked out of curiosity. coffee shop What happened to the coffee grounds and where did he go every day? “

“He was shocked to find that the coffee was disposed of in a landfill, and they had to pay for it.”

She joked that she and her brother “named (for themselves) as crazy brothers who collect coffee and make cosmetics around London.”

When the coffee collection began, “people began to contact us about all kinds of by-products,” Anna said, saying that more than 15 are now incorporated into their range.

Among these are the water from making concentrated fruit juice, the faded flowers discarded by the florist, and the remaining chai spices.

Used ground that would otherwise be thrown away can be rearranged to make a facial scrub

Used ground that would otherwise be thrown away can be rearranged to make a facial scrub.

“Not gross”

Coffee grounds, for example, are free, but Upcircle pays for some of these ingredients. However, the logistics involved in collecting them can be complex and costly.

500,000 tonnes of coffee waste are discarded each year in the UK, and the company claims to have recycled 400 tonnes so far.

Nonetheless, Anna Brightman admitted that the idea of ​​selling beauty products made from “garbage” was initially frustrating by industry insiders.

She said she must strive to convey the message, “These ingredients we are dealing with are coarse, old and clean.”

Young people are “more open to the idea of ​​a circular economy,” she added.

“For obvious reasons, they are worried about the future of our planet.”

Barbara Scott Atkinson, the prescriber of UpCircle’s products, says used coffee grounds are more effective as a skin care ingredient than dried ones.

These garments made from waste were designed by Stella McCartney and exhibited at the

These garments made from waste were designed by Stella McCartney and exhibited at the “Waste Age: What Design Can Do” exhibition. At the Design Museum in London.

“It’s heated and moist, which makes it more suitable for use than regular ground coffee and raises antioxidant levels.”

The company is sending raw materials for diversion at its factory in Bridport, on the southwest coast of England.

Citrus essential oils are used for scrubbing, so they have a scent in the factory.

The manufacturing process is simple: coffee grounds are mixed with sugar, Essential oilsThen whisk shea butter and add natural preservatives.

The exfoliator is then poured into a glass bottle, of which 3,000 are distributed weekly throughout the UK.

According to the company, hesitating to reveal sales and growth figures, demand is growing rapidly, especially in the United States.

Increasing interest in diversion Food waste Upcircle competes with other brands of natural cosmetics, such as Wildefruit in the UK, Frank Body in Australia, and even the huge Body Shop in the UK.

The photo shows a prototype of a building wall made of calcium carbonate and bagasse waste, a by-product of sugar-refini.

The photo shows a prototype of a building wall made of calcium carbonate and bagasse waste, which are by-products of the sugar refining process.

-‘Put in landfill’-

as a result, Coffee plantation According to Anna Brightman, it’s starting to become popular.

“Some cafes say we want to be able to split the week. We receive coffee waste on Mondays and Tuesdays and give us the rest of the week,” she adds. rice field.

To combat the destruction of the planet’s resources, entrepreneurs and designers are increasingly devising new ways to create value from waste.

An exhibition called “Waste Age” (until February 20) at the Design Museum in London will showcase the use of agave or sisal hemp fiber by Mexican designer Fernandra Posse, who studied at the Central Saint Martins School of Art in London. It has been.

Laposse transforms the natural fibers of the plants used in the production of tequila into avant-garde furniture such as tables, benches and hammocks.

He also uses the colorful corn cobs of the country of birth to make furniture and veneers, boosting the “circular economy” and creating employment.

  • A prototype of an alternative in-flight meal tray made to replace disposable materials with a combination of edible, reusable, and reusable ones.

    A prototype of an alternative in-flight meal tray made to replace disposable materials with a combination of edible, reusable, and biodegradable materials.

  • UpCircle co-founder Anna Brightman said young people are

    UpCircle co-founder Anna Brightman says young people are “interested in the future of our planet” and therefore more open to the idea of ​​a circular economy.

“In the UK, 15% of the waste is recycled and the rest is incinerated or landfilled,” said exhibition curator Gemma Curtin.

The exhibition at the Design Museum also features chairs made from old refrigerators, baskets decorated with fishnet tights recovered from the sea, and recycled fashion designers such as Stella McCartney and Phoebe English.

Curtin added that this encourages visitors to ask what really “luxury” is.

The last room of the exhibition features furniture and building blocks made from takeaway coffee cups. In the UK alone, 2.5 billion pieces are discarded each year, and the thin plastic coating makes them unrecyclable.

Scientists have come to demand urgent production limits as large quantities of plastic are manufactured and then discarded around the world.

The United Nations will hold a conference on plastic pollution efforts in Nairobi later this month. This could prelude discussions on global plastic treaties.


How Waste Coffee Scraps Help Fuel London Buses


© 2022 AFP

Quote: Valuable Garbage: UK Waste is a new life taken from https: //phys.org/news/2022-02-treasured-trash-uk-lease-life.html on February 17, 2022. Acquire a lease (February 17, 2022)

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UK waste gets a new life lease

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